Weekend of Luxury in Tokyo

Weekend of Luxury in Tokyo

Enjoy a weekend of luxury in Tokyo!

Tokyo is one of the world’s largest metropolitan areas with almost 40 million people. It has everything the curious traveler can want – history, culture, art, and perhaps most importantly, food. Although the city is massive, it is possible to explore a large part of it in a short time!

Your tour will introduce you to some of Tokyo’s most popular spots, in addition to Japanese culture. As you explore the city with your guide, you’ll discover amazing, hidden local restaurants, neighborhoods, and fascinating people.

Day 1

Haneda Airport Arrival Transfer

Haneda Airport Arrival Transfer

Meet your driver in the arrival area and move to Tokyo. It is about a 30 minute drive.

Private Guided Tour

Private Guided Tour

Meet your guide in the lobby of the hotel and set out for a private guided tour.

Meiji Shrine

Meiji Shrine

Meiji Shrine was built nearly 100 years ago to commemorate Emperor Meiji’s contribution to modern Japan. The shrine is entirely surrounded by a forest, with an area of 70 hectares of land and over 120,000 trees, all of which were donated to the shrine from different parts of Japan. Although rather young compared with other shrines, Meiji shrine has its own dramatic story to tell. While the original construction of the shrine was completed in 1926, the shrine was destroyed during the bombings of World War II and rebuilt in 1958. If you’re lucky, you’ll spot a couple on their wedding day, making their way through the shrine’s grounds on their way to their ceremony.

Kimono Dressing

Kimono Dressing

A popular and fun activity, even among Japanese tourists, is to rent kimonos and spend the day touring in true fashion. Your experience will start with a proper kimono fitting, choosing the garments of your choice. You'll then have your hair styled quickly and enjoy a brief tea ceremony before setting out for today's route. For the gentlemen, hakama are also available for renting. This traditional garment is often worn by men and is the perfect accompaniment to those wearing kimono.

Shibuya Crossing & Hachiko Statue

Shibuya Crossing & Hachiko Statue

In Shibuya one can witness (and experience) the world's busiest intersection, as well as one of Japan's most endearing symbols of loyalty - the statue of Hachiko. The Shibuya scramble is located in the heart of Shibuya's shopping district. Due to its proximity with many popular stores, Shibuya Station, and the location of countless delicious eating spots, the intersection regularly sees thousands of people cross each time the traffic lights turn red and the pedestrian lights turn green. Also located in Shibuya is the bronze statue of the dog Hachiko. Hachiko was well known for his loyalty in waiting for his master for nearly 10 years, arriving at the station daily in anticipation of his master's return from work. Soon after, a statue was erected in his honor. Unfortunately the statue was melted down during World War II, but the current replica was commissioned shortly after.

Golden Gai Food Tour

Golden Gai Food Tour

During World War II Tokyo sustained heavy damage, with most neighborhoods being completely destroyed. While Shinjuku Station was spared most of the destruction of war, the surrounding neighborhoods were not as fortunate. Shortly after the war during reconstruction, small eating stalls popped up in the West Gate area of Shinjuku to serve commuters. Time marched on, and the area saw continued development, redevelopment and further modernization. Despite Shinjuku's current vibe of being modern and hip, there is a small area that time has forgotten, providing visitors a chance to step back into the Showa post-war period. We recommend enjoying the yakitori and motsu (entrails) for an authentic post-war eating experience. With the world’s highest number of bars per square meter, Tokyo’s Shinjuku Golden Gai neighbourhood is a must-visit. Shinjuku Golden Gai showcases the best bars, restaurants, and food stalls the compact enclave has to offer. Feast on four Japanese dishes, including Tonkotsu Ramen, and char grilled chicken, and delve into the area’s rich history with your guide. This is also where Anthony Bourdain did his food tour during his visit to Japan.

TRUNK (HOTEL)

TRUNK (HOTEL) (2 nights)

TRUNK HOTEL offers a selection of guestrooms which allow guests to fully experience the concept of "Socializing" through its various designs and featured items. Premium activities only available at TRUNK(HOTEL)can also be experienced here.

Day 2

Private Guided Tour

Private Guided Tour

Meet your guide in the lobby of the hotel and set out for a private guided tour.

Public transportation for touring

Public transportation for touring

Today you will tour using a combination of trains, buses, and taxis.

Tsukiji & Toyosu Market

Tsukiji & Toyosu Market

Every day, from Monday to Saturday at the famous tuna auction is held at Toyosu Fish Market in the early morning hours and afterwards the market opens up to the general public midmorning. This is an excellent chance to discover some of the world’s best seafood and see this famous market in action. While the inner market has many shops that sell business to business, the outer market in Tsukiji is a wonderful chance to to sample a wide variety of some of Japan's finest seafood and various fresh, hot snacks. Your brief tour today will take you to the outer market to experience some of Tsukiji’s best eating (and drinking). We recommend the yaki-tamago - a sweet, custard like scrambled egg pan fried in layers and served fresh out of the pan.

Hamarikyu Gardens

Hamarikyu Gardens

Your first stop today will be the beautiful Hamarikyu Garden. Nestled along the coast surrounded by high rise buildings, the garden was once a popular duck hunting ground. The views of the garden change depending on when you visit as the pond takes in sea water during high tides.

Asakusa

Asakusa

Asakusa is home to one of Tokyo’s most famous gates – Kaminari-mon. As you make your way through the many shopping stalls, you’ll eventually come to Senso-ji, Tokyo’s oldest temple. It is here that visitors can enjoy a striking contrast of ancient and modern Japan – Tokyo’s oldest temple, built in 645AD, with the world’s tallest free-standing tower, Tokyo Skytree, as a backdrop.

YA NE SEN & Calligraphy Experience

YA NE SEN & Calligraphy Experience

Take a casual stroll through the famous YA NE SEN area. Comprised of three small “towns”, YAnaka, NEzu, and SENdagi, this area is popular among tourists and locals alike for its rustic architecture, plentiful eating, and interesting shopping. During your time in this area, take in a calligraphy experience and learn the secrets to Japanese brush-style writing. During this lesson, you'll break down complex Chinese characters into their individual components (called "radicals") and practice writing each one. After going through the basics, you'll then use these radicals to write more complex characters. As you finish the lesson, you'll work on your final product to bring home with you. After completing this lesson, the signs you see around you during your time in Japan will be just a tad more familiar to you.

Day 3

Private Guided Tour

Private Guided Tour

Meet your guide in the lobby of the hotel and set out for a private guided tour.

Private vehicle, full day

Private vehicle, full day

Tour in the comfort of your own private luxury vehicle.

Hasedera Temple

Hasedera Temple

Hasedera temple is halfway up a tree-lined slope to the west of Kamakura. It has wonderful views of the city. The temple is famous for its more than 30-foot-tall eleven-headed statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy. It is regarded as the tallest wooden sculptures in Japan and, according to legend, it is from the same tree that a similar statue in Nara's Hasedera Temple. Following the stairs to the top of the slope is the Jizo Hall with hundreds of statues of Jizo Bodhisattva, the protector of children.

Kamakura Town

Kamakura Town

Kamakura was the center of political power in Japan from the 12th to 14th century. It's a small village on the coast of Japan . Wander the streets to explore the village. Visit the well-known sweets shop and see a master at his craft. There are metalworkers through out the town who are more than happy for visitors to see their work. The town can easily be walked on foot or try a ride in a 2-wheeled rickshaw.

Kamakura Daibutsu

Kamakura Daibutsu

The Grand Buddha of Kamakura sits in the open air on a large stone platform. It was housed in various temples until the 15th century when its housing was destroyed in a tsunami. The Buddha at a height is second only to the Buddha at Todaiji Temple in Nara.

Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu

Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu

Tsurugaoia Hachiman-gu is Kamakura's most Important shrine. It was founded in 1063 and is dedicated to the god, Hachiman, the patron deity of the Minamoto Family, the shoguns of the Kamakura Era. The shrine is reached by a long walkway that leads from the waterfront through the center or town, with many torii gates along the way.

Zeniarai Benzaiten Shrine

Zeniarai Benzaiten Shrine

Zeniarai Benzaiten Shrine is a well known shrine to the west of Kamakura. It is famous as a place where visitors wash their money with the hope that the money will double. The shrine was founded in the 12th century by Minamoto Yoritomo, the first Kamakura shogun. The shrine is a very good example of the blending of Buddhism and native Shinto beliefs.

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